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are actually sold out during the first presentation and >>guest: are kidding me? please >>host: bring us more >>guest: will medellin >>host: miglin is that next i will be back at noon with the kindle fire. cheers! [♪ music ♪] everybody my name is connie craig-carroll with your final visit of the year for marilyn miglin.now coming up we have 15 of marilyn miglin is the finest fragrances. she is a beauty pioneer with over 40 years of experience in the beauty industry. she is a former model and ballerina upper yet she is hands on. . --and that she is hands on. >>guest: thank you to everybody. >>host: we have 15 of your finest fragrances $17 on flex pay. i know we are experiencing a hold right now, you can shop by can visit www.hsn.com. views expressed automated ordering. you have chosen the best of the best fragrances. >>host: >>guest: >>guest: i think our ladies chose those. >>host: best sellers from all of your collections.it looks like a beautiful book. if you are giving the entire collection as a gift. these are wonderful. >>guest: you can do two, four, five, think about the q
, the main thesis is the 300 million gouda recognizers and they're all basically using the same algorithm and is recognizers connect themselves in a hierarchy. the neo cortex can develop these ideas were. that's the essence of it. they basically running the same method in secret of human thought is the ability to build a hierarchy with other recognizers. so at a low level where recognition simple things like the crossfire and a higher level you have thomasa as an apple. it's a much higher level. that was funny, that was ironic. they are the same except for the position in the hierarchy. produce a hierarchy come with? were not with warren -- [inaudible] we are not born with that knowledge of english or chinese. in fact, all of these connections reflect memories, personality. the neo cortex creates from our own experience. so the more important you are what you think. the grandson has laid down several layers. you basically can work on one-liner at a time. >> host: the layers have been sent to some extent by biology come at a geometric information. >> guest: the ability to create the layers
very glamorous i not? argument 8 hangers and use the bag to give someone whether it be a stuffed animal or anything else.3 >>host: gloria thinks the way i think because i the banks to. that is what i am saying i will buy the hangers heat and for me and in the bag zen-like beautiful for gift giving put something else in here. pajamas or slippers are anything.collar absolutely! i have to have the bag if i give someone a gift that will tell them what back. [laughter] >>guest: there you go. >>host: these and the bags to keep 3 gifting with. you can use these. collar it is gorgeous! that is a great thing to do your round. >>caller: have a different bag for every season. >>guest: that is a great bandeau! ok i did not think of that. >>caller: they are gorgeous! >>guest: this should not be the only day you can get this. >>caller: i have your sunglasses for different pairs, i just look like everyone says so look at her! >>guest: i am so excited. well i am going to tell you you picked the right moment because within this next few minutes that is it is over! >>host: we all that bag
.please call us want to hear kindle stories. 1-866-376-talk 1-866-376-talk 1-866-376-talk cable and your www.simplytoimpress. com belcher.belcher. i only have a handful of these cases. -- a voucher >>guest: number one selling 7 in. tablet in america. for a reason and is the kindle fire and people are crazy about it. lowest price we have ever done and we have sold the kindle fire before. people love it and it has always been at a higher price and this is the lowest price the lowest price for any tablet on the air. you are buying the last tablets for this price until the end of the year. free shipping and handling now over 35,000 are sold today. arms so glad you joined us for the last presentation. is this a great reader? yes and is an android operating system and yes 8 gb of memory build and and because this is a kindle he has unlimited memory because everything from the amazon appstore that you purchase goes to the cloud. extremes' back-and-forth to tablet. -- it steams back andforth to your tablet. >>host: i am going to make sound effects while he is talking because he did to me last nigh
the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then in the colony's some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: right. the common law right to have the firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of these? >> guest: local commanders, towns. later on became more broadbased, but as tensions and hostility is mounted between the british authorities and the colonists in approach to the revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders of the time has an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement or was it this group of volunteers on was that all law enforcement? >> guest: depends on the size of the town but there were not armed policemen
the overall agreement, so the u.s. policy towards the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's a big meeting on april 23rd on april april 23rd the united states had changed course so at that meeting first teammates with his advisers one-fifth within marshall, leahy telling him they are grateful to the soviets and since the secretary of war understood the soviets have a much better understanding to their own security especially around poland than we do. >> stepping back from those details, do you think that it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each to ochre and had i think was fair to say the entire one for all because the soviets obviously have their own different smaller states under the control and fifth. whether the two powers were in there is the logical bases to get along for very long. of course it never would have happened, but arguably stabenow as you know himself who is the head of the communist party told the communists and 45 get ready for the class war to continue in effect. don't believe the peaceful coexistence
it at times, but he also had made remarks that allowed off the militia was a useful thing to have feared it could have built the continental army that the existence of the militias and people who would than in militias and more importantly volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms and that was key. >> host: said people were using it on the frontier, protections against the native americans, hunting certainly am in the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. as to exactly. the common moderate to have and use firearms became the pacific duty to use them and called upon. >> host: who was in charge of malicious? >> guest: local commander towns very often have them, new england certainly. later on they became more broadly based. but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities in the colonists and the approach to the revolutionary war, he was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time, was to organize one person in these communities are with this group of voluntee
a big project. it was important for us to have the book. i was suppressed how little information you can convey in a 60-minute documentary. so the book, it was an 800 page book, we have to cut out 200 pages to get it down because there's so much to tell but we also wanted to give the footnotes and sources a much more detailed discussion because we know we're going to be challenged. we're offering a perspective that is not the mainstream perspective and we want to have our sources when we do get challenged. >> and addressed to people like my daughters and sons, high school level history. we wanted to gear so it you could read this book and see the document rhythm it's tough but you can understand it at 16 and 1. college level you start to specialize and much of this is available to students, but we really wanted -- my daughter's history books, even today, when you get, for example, to the hiroshima, there's no mention of an alternative possibility. it's the americans had to drop the bomb to save american lives because the japanese were fanatics. you don't hear the russian side of the equa
almost of the u.s. economy and competition just seems to be at the wrong level and patients are frustrated. another reason i wrote the book is that doctors are getting crushed right now. they have got declining medicare payments. they have got increasing overhead, hospitals have more expenses. malpractice rates are going up. the burnout rate is 46% and doctors are getting crushed right now and i just felt like we needed a voice out there and it's okay to talk to the general public. >> host: so you make the point that medical mistakes for the third leading cause of death in the united states. that is a shocking figure. can you talk a little bit about that? >> guest: it was shocking even for me as someone interested in the skill and quality to put it in that way. medical mistakes. we kill as many people from medical mistakes as we do from car accidents and other three, four and five causes in the u.s.. i guess i've never really thought of it that way because we don't really talk as openly and honestly about mistakes as we showed in our profession, to be very blunt. think about
, we are helping her. use your own judgment and decide what you're comfortable with. so i got to talk to people who really knew her well and relatives send dog trainers and people who ran her estates and the manager, her horse trainers. it was crown jewelers, politicians who knew her and members of the clergy so what i loved with a book like this is getting many angles of visions, some quite intimate and some people who had very focused intent like the portrait artist for example. a very informal time with her and saw a whole different view of her than other people. >> finally sally bedell smith, why do we care about the royal family like we do? >> they are an extraordinary institution that binds britain together through their continuity, their connection to british history and today really, there's a term which is not terribly good but they call it the welfare monarchy. the queen and all the members of her family spends so much time supporting charities, can and should beating their names and their efforts and you know, they reward people for good works and they set an example of ser
ingredient you can use in the kitchen. you can do anything to it. you can bake it, rustic, barbecue it, just amazing. >> lorraine wallace are these are recipes? >> all of my recipes and they been tried and tested and it's what i love to do. >> i am the tester. i have not cooked any of them but i had eaten everyone. >> it has family stories, family recipes and a family tip that about a. >> can you give us a little background on you two, how long you have been married? >> we have six children and we have been together for 16 years. >> but i have to say if the old-fashioned way. i had four and she had two. >> getting your family around the table and trying to figure out everybody schedule and their needs, including their husband who has 5:00 in the morning get up on sunday. it's amazing, so this great book helps you do that. >> what time do you be the chicken on sunday? >> we eat saturday night. >> soup is on sunday. >> hence the night, saturday night chicken. >> you would think i would have caught that. mr. sunday saturday night chicken, lorraine wallace, chris and lorraine wallace thank you v
for joining us. >> coming up, booktv presents "after words" orientate gases to interview others. this week, dr. marty makary examines dangers of a hospital stay in his book, "unaccountable." the john hopkins surgeon provides an inside look at hospital errors, overtreatment in the closed-door culture that protects medical practitioners. discuss the findings and experience with president of washington d.c.'s sibley hospital, richard davis. >> hi, i'm cheap davis and i'm here today with marty makary, author of "unaccountable: what hospitals won't tell you and how transparency can revolutionize health care." so welcome. >> guest: good to be with you. >> host: you are an expert in this field. tell us about the reasons that you decided to write the book and some of your findings. >> guest: well, two main drivers led me to write the book. number one, patients often tell me when they come to the hospital they feel like they're walking in blind. there's a strike system they don't know how to evaluate. when he asked my patients, why did you choose this hospital, over my career i've gotten answers like t
to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going through t
challenged by excellence. .. >> tell us about the reasons you decided to write the book and your findings. >> two main drivers that led me to write the book. number one, patients tell me when they come to the hospital they feel like they're walking in blind there's this giant system they don't know how to evaluate. and when i ask my patients, why did you choose to come to this hospital, i have gotten answers like the parking here is good. we can do better than that. this is one-fifth of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be wrong level and patients frustrated. the other reason i wrote the book is doctors are getting crushed right now. they have declining medicare payments, they've got increasing overhead. hospitals have more expenses. now practice rates are going up. the burnout rate in healthcare is 46%. doctors are getting crushed and i felt like we needed a voice and it's okay to talk to the general public. >> host: you make the point that medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death in the united states. that's a shocking figure. can you talk about that? cincinnati was
grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: the -- at this time was there organized law enforcement in the commun
. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't
. this is of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be the long will and patience are frustrated. the other reason i read the book is that doctors are getting crushed right now. they have declining medicare payments, increasing overhead hospitals have more expenses, malpractice rates are going up and the burnout rate is 46%. doctors are getting crushed right now and i felt like we needed a voice out there that it's okay to talk to each other public. >> host: you make the point that medical mistakes if you will or the third leading cause of death in the united states. that is a shocking figure. can you talk about that? >> guest: it was shocking for me even somebody interested in the field of quality to see it put in that way. medical mistakes are number three we kill as many people from medical mistakes as we do from car accidents and other causes of death in the united states. i guess i have never really thought of it that we because we don't really talk as openly and honestly as we should in our profession to be very blunt. you know, you think about number one, heart disease, the number one cause
and their families. so, thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn into the issue? y "bully," why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in school i was one of those kids who was really shy, and i tried to sail under the radar and i was someone that solid taking place around me and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had no words for it other than adolescents other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal right of passage. i think there was a moment when there was a possibility for change, and the director and i decided to start the film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up coming to the surface to say this isn't something that we can acc
mom, it is exceptional you can get 14 k gold and your choice of colored diamonds. and let us get started with a beautiful ring, it is made for a princess and the princess to know and love will buy you the ring. it isring princess style than it does look like a beautiful pink and white snowflake. we do have about 40 available that will be. get pink has always symbolized femina mandate an increase in love in it is exactly that.it is the most delicate a beautiful ring, pink safire switchers so coveted because you know that sapphire's come in many colors but some liberties are always over pink gemstones in diamonds and you have the white diamond set to contrast so beautifully.this is over one ct of the pink safire and white diamonds and this is if you are wondering about the amount of sapphire, it is 74 points of the pink safire which is in the crumb them family, --corundum. we do have pink ends in flower petals around the ends and you do have white diamonds which will be toe center pink safire and the diamonds that you have traveling down the shoulders and what to show you how this
-bullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s. >> host: i'm so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely-acclaimed and really important new documentary "bully" and the co-editor of the book by the same title. both of which out our nation's dirty little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids on both sides and on the sidelines and their families. so thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. >> guest: thank you, donna. >> host: why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? why bully? why you, why now? >> guest: well, i come from a background as a writer, and when i was in middle school, i was one of the kids who was really shy, um, i i think i tried to sail under the radar, and i was someone who i saw bullying taking place around me, and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us, i think, in this country were starting to see people coming
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)